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Celeriac and Potato Gratin

Celeriac and Potato Gratin


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I love the aniseed flavor of celeriac. You can also grate some Gruyère or Fontina cheese in between the layers.

Ingredients

  • ¾ stick butter, softened, plus a little extra for greasing
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 2 pounds potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 18 ounces celeriac, peeled, cut into quarters, and thinly sliced
  • Sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Cheese, such as Gruyère or Fontina, for layering
  • 2 cups half and half
  • ½ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Grease a baking dish with butter and sprinkle the crushed garlic on the bottom of the dish.

Drop the sliced potatoes and celeriac into a saucepan of boiling water for 4–5 minutes, then drain and make layers in the dish, overlapping the slices a little and seasoning each layer.

Pour the half and half over the potatoes and use your hand to push down the potatoes until they are completely immersed in the milk. Sprinkle the nutmeg over the potatoes and cover with a butter wrapper or parchment paper.

Bake in the oven for 30 minutes. Remove the butter wrapper and turn up the heat to 400 degrees until the top is golden (about 20 minutes).


CHEESY Celeriac Potato Gratin

This scalloped celeriac and potato gratin is all sorts of cheesy, carby goodness. A normally rich potato gratin is lightened and gets more flavour from the celeriac. This recipe uses a whole celeriac in it!

I cannot describe what a serendipitous exercise this celeriac gratin was. I didn't expect to love it as much as I did but I had to pull myself away from this as I was headed out to lunch just after I pulled this gratin out of the oven.

What is a celeriac? Celeriac is also called celery root whose relatives are celery, parsley and parsnip. Celeriac is a root vegetable that is actually the same plant as celery (apium graveolens) but celeriac is cultivated for the roots while celery is cultivated for its stalks. Celeriac has a mild nutty, celery flavour.

When choosing celeriac, go for one that is firm without any soft spots. Remove the leaves and store it in the crisper of your fridge in a perforated bag for 2 weeks. You can use the leaves to garnish soups or wherever you would use celery leaves.

Celeriac is very versatile and can be eaten raw (eg in celeriac remoulade) or it can be cooked. It is in season from May to August in the Southern Hemisphere or September to April in the Northern Hemisphere. It has plenty of health benefits including being a source of vitamins B6, C and K, fibre, antioxidants and minerals.

Celeriac and potato together? I prefer to use both celeriac and potato rather than all celeriac and this recipe uses one whole large celeriac anyway. Potatoes aren't as watery as celeriac and they provide creamy texture to celeriac's slightly more watery texture.

Can I make this gratin ahead of time? Definitely! This can be made the day before up to step 3. Just cover, take out of the fridge 1 hour or so before baking it and then bake just before you want to serve it. The celeriac might release a bit of water if it sits overnight but it will be fine and will reabsorb after the gratin has been sitting for 20 minutes or so.

How to make cream if you don't have it? I ran out of cream when I was making this so to make 1 cup of cream, mix 1/4 cup of melted butter with 3/4 cup of full cream milk.

I have to admit when I first saw the celeriac I got a bit of veg dread. You know the feeling you get when you get a vegetable you don't know how to cook. I didn't grow up eating celeriac, fennel, turnips or swedes. There aren't a lot of potatoes in Chinese cooking either (although there's one fantastic recipe I will share with you soon).

But then I started to read up more about the humble celeriac and started to appreciate how low fuss it was and how versatile it was. I mean what vegetable tastes equally good raw and cooked and actually becomes sweeter when it is cooked (YES!)? I started to look at it in a different light, especially after how delicious this gratin was!

So tell me Dear Reader, do you ever get veg dread? Is there a vegetable that you don't really know how to cook or prepare? Do you like celeriac?

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella


Potato and Celery Root Gratin with Leeks

Preheat to 350°. Heat cream, garlic, and thyme sprig in a medium saucepan just until bubbles begin to form around edge of pan. Remove from heat set aside to steep.

Step 2

Melt 1 Tbsp. butter in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add leeks season with salt and cook, stirring often, until tender (do not brown), 10–12 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.

Step 3

Butter a 3-qt. gratin dish with remaining 1 Tbsp butter. Layer 1/3 of potato slices and 1/3 of celery root slices evenly over bottom of baking dish. Cover with 1/3 of leeks, then 1/3 of Gruyère. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and 1 tsp. thyme leaves. Repeat layers twice more. Strain cream mixture into a medium pitcher and pour over vegetables.

Step 4

Set gratin dish on a large rimmed baking sheet and cover tightly with foil. Bake for 1 hour. Carefully remove foil continue baking until top is golden brown and sauce is bubbling, 25–30 minutes. DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Tent with foil and rewarm in a 300° oven until hot, about 20 minutes


Recipe Summary

  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon dried marjoram
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 6 cups thinly sliced baking potato (about 2 pounds)
  • Cooking spray
  • 1 (2-pound) celeriac (celery root), peeled, quartered lengthwise, and thinly sliced
  • 1 cup thinly sliced leek (about 2 medium)
  • 1 cup thinly sliced green onion
  • 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded reduced-fat Jarlsberg cheese
  • ½ cup fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
  • ½ cup dry sherry
  • ½ cup dry breadcrumbs
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

Combine first 3 ingredients.

Arrange 2 cups potato slices in a 13 x 9-inch baking dish coated with cooking spray. Arrange half of celeriac slices over potato slices. Top with 1/2 cup leek, 1/2 cup onions, and 1/2 cup Jarlsberg cheese. Sprinkle with one-third of marjoram mixture. Repeat procedure with 2 cups potato slices remaining celeriac slices, leek, onions, and Jarlsberg cheese and one-third of marjoram mixture.

Top with 2 cups potato slices. Pour broth and sherry over potato mixture sprinkle with remaining marjoram mixture. Cover and bake at 375° for 1 hour or until tender.

Combine breadcrumbs and remaining ingredients sprinkle over potato mixture. Bake, uncovered, an additional 20 minutes or until lightly browned. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.


Potato-and-Celeriac Gratin

Rub the sides and the bottom of an 11 x 7-inch baking dish coated with cooking spray with garlic halves. Crush garlic halves set aside.

Cut celeriac into 1/4-inch-thick slices cut slices into quarters to measure 2 cups, reserving remaining celeriac for another use. Place 2 cups celeriac, potatoes, and 3 thyme sprigs in a large saucepan, and cover with water bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes or until potatoes are tender drain and discard thyme.

While the potatoes are cooking, combine flour, salt, and pepper in a small saucepan gradually add milk, stirring with a whisk. Stir in crushed garlic and 1 thyme sprig. Place the pan over medium heat, and cook until thick (about 10 minutes), stirring constantly with a whisk. Remove from heat stir in 3/4 cup cheese.

Arrange potatoes and celeriac in baking dish pour sauce over vegetables. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup cheese. Bake at 350° for 30 minutes or until lightly browned. Discard thyme.


Potato and celeriac gratin

Thinly slice the potatoes. Peel and thinly slice the celeriac and onion (ideally in a food processor as this takes only 5min).

Cook the vegetables together in boiling, salted water for 3-4min or until beginning to soften. Meanwhile, bring the single cream to the boil with the crushed garlic.

Drain the vegetables. Stir into hot cream with the ham and all but 60ml (4tbsp) cheese. Season.

Spoon into a buttered large, shallow, ovenproof Dish. Sprinkle with remaining cheese and cook at 220°C (425°F) mark 7 for about 20min or until golden brown. Serve with French beans.

Like this? You'll love.

If you're entertaining.

An exotic fruit platter makes a refreshing finale to this quick, rich supper. For 4 servings, cut 1 small pawpaw, 1 small mango and 1 small pineapple into wedges. Use other fruits, such as peeled satsumas, fresh dates, passion fruits, lychees and figs to complete the platter. Adel halves of fresh limes, to squeeze over the fruit. Serve with Greek yogurt drizzled with runny honey.


Celeriac and Potato Gratin Recipe

Heat the oven to 180C, 160C fan, 350F, gas 4. Heat the milk with th onion, cloves and bay leaf until almost boiling, remove from the heat and set aside to infuse for 30 minutes to an hour. Remove to a jug, discarding the onion, cloves and bay leaf.

Melt the butter in a saucepan over a medium-high heat, add teh flour and cook for 1 minute, stirring. Turn down the heat slightly and gradually pour in the milk, whisking constantly until it becomes a smooth, thick sauce. Add 50g (2oz) of the Parmesan, the cream, thyme and nutmeg, season well and rmove from the heat. Cover with clingfilm and set aside.

Layer a third of the celeriac in the casserole, then a third of the potatoes, and top evenly with a quarter of the cheese sauce. Repeat these layers again, top with the sliced leek, crumble the blue cheese over, then spread another quarter of the cheese sauce. Sprinkle the breadcrumbs and the remaining Parmesan over. Cover and bake for 1 hour 15 minutes, removing the lid after 1 hour. Turn the oven up to 220C, 200C fan, 425F, gas 7 and cook for another 15 minutes or until browned.

Top Tip for making Celeriac and Potato Gratin

Make 2 separate quantities and freeze one thaw before reheating. Or use as a main course, then any leftovers can be used as a side dish to service with grilled chicken or meat.


Mick’s Celeriac, Potato And Pear Gratin

Mick Kelly is back with another one of his favourite recipes. This dish is a great accompaniment for Sunday dinner and the combination of pears and celeriac gives a new twist on classic potato gratin.

Ingredients

  • 1 knob butter
  • About 400g floury potatoes
  • About 400g celeriac
  • 2 firm, medium pears (about 300g)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 400ml double cream
  • 100ml whole milk
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and halved
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 good grating nutmeg

Step 1 - Cook

Heat the oven to 170c. Rub a gratin dish with the butter. Peel the potatoes and slice them thinly, either with a sharp knife or a mandolin. Cut the outer layer off the celeriac and slice this thinly, too. Peel, quarter and core the pears, and slice each quarter thinly lengthwise. Combine the vegetables and pear in a bowl, season and toss. Arrange the mixture in the gratin dish, pressing it as flat as possible so there are not too many gaps and air pockets.

Put the cream and milk in a saucepan with the garlic halves, the bay leaf, the nutmeg and plenty of salt and pepper, and heat until just below boiling. Pour over the veg in the dish (take the bay leaf out at this stage, but keep the garlic in). Bake for 1.5 hours. The gratin is ready when the top is golden and bubbling, and a small, sharp knife easily pierces the vegetables all the way through. You may want to turn up the heat to 190-200C (gas mark 5 or 6) for five minutes at the end for a bit of extra bubbling crispness.

Step 2 - Serve

Leave to rest and cool for five minutes or so before serving.

Ingredients

  • 1 knob butter
  • About 400g floury potatoes
  • About 400g celeriac
  • 2 firm, medium pears (about 300g)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 400ml double cream
  • 100ml whole milk
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and halved
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 good grating nutmeg

Step 1 - Cook

Heat the oven to 170c. Rub a gratin dish with the butter. Peel the potatoes and slice them thinly, either with a sharp knife or a mandolin. Cut the outer layer off the celeriac and slice this thinly, too. Peel, quarter and core the pears, and slice each quarter thinly lengthwise. Combine the vegetables and pear in a bowl, season and toss. Arrange the mixture in the gratin dish, pressing it as flat as possible so there are not too many gaps and air pockets.

Put the cream and milk in a saucepan with the garlic halves, the bay leaf, the nutmeg and plenty of salt and pepper, and heat until just below boiling. Pour over the veg in the dish (take the bay leaf out at this stage, but keep the garlic in). Bake for 1.5 hours. The gratin is ready when the top is golden and bubbling, and a small, sharp knife easily pierces the vegetables all the way through. You may want to turn up the heat to 190-200C (gas mark 5 or 6) for five minutes at the end for a bit of extra bubbling crispness.


The Little Bean

I’m full of nerves recently, I don’t deal with anxiety well and choose to do anything but deal with what’s causing it. I have a final show to put up at the end of next month, and a wedding photography job that I’m having to prepare for in the same week. Both of these events will pretty much sum up as to how creative and versatile I am able to be as a photographer, it will truly test me as I have been so used to shooting food for most of the last year. So I’m a little weak at the knees at the moment along with suffering from stomach flips at the very thought of hanging an end of year show, and my first wedding job.

I won’t be blogging so regularly now until after May when everything is done and dusted, however much I wish I could do this everyday. I CANNOT wait to have this blog as my full time hobby, especially now as summer is just around the corner and the days are getting longer, which means more light and results in more available daylight to photograph. I’m a few weeks behind on my blogging, forgive me, but I’m having to go cold turkey starting from today, unless I get a large amount of work done and have time to cook and blog til’ my heart’s content.

Celeriac is a vegetable I had never tasted before, until Mr Slater required one for his potato & celeriac cake. No, not of the sponge variety, that would have to be a very acquired taste, I’m still trying to digest the idea of a beetroot chocolate cake! A layer of celeriac, a layer of potato covered in a thick buttery sauce. This was a perfect accompaniment for a beautiful fillet of smoked haddock that I baked in a foil parcel, even though I could’ve eaten the whole damn dish but refrained in the knowledge of how much butter there actually was in between the layers.

I’m nearly at the end of Mr Slater’s potato section in the book so if I have the time, I will try to do a few more posts, but if I don’t, please make the most of your spuds and get creative!

So wish me luck for the next month or so, and I shall see you on the other side! In a while crocodile.

a handful of thyme leaves

A smoked haddock fillet parcel, perfect as the main dish.

Celeriac Cake

2 heaped tablespoons Dijon mustard

a level tablespoon of thyme leaves

If you fancy the fish as a main:

Allow one fish fillet per person

-smoked haddock, cod or mackerel

Slice the potatoes and celeriac very thinly so you can see through them, mix together and soak in a bowl of cold water. Melt the butter in a saucepan and when it starts to bubble, add the garlic and cook slowly for five minutes. Take off the heat and stir in the mustard, thyme leaves and a grinding of salt and pepper. Drain the potatoes and celeriac and dry them on some kitchen paper. Toss them in with the mustard butter until they’re all coated. Lay the mixture in a baking dish and pour over the stock. Cover with a circle of greasproof paper, then bake in the oven, preheated to 190C for about an hour until tender.

Remove the greasproof paper and turn the heat up to 220C and bake until the top is crispy.

For the fish:

Place a fillet of fish in a sheet of foil, season with salt and pepper. Leave out the salt if the fish is smoked, it will already be quite salty. Top with some dill, parsley, and wedges of lemon, then add a scoop of butter on top. Roll the parcel up like a cornish pasty and bake in the oven for around twenty minutes during the last bit of cooking of the celeriac and potatoes.