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Asparagus and Potato Soup with Crab and Chive Soured Cream recipe

Asparagus and Potato Soup with Crab and Chive Soured Cream recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Soup
  • Vegetable soup
  • Root vegetable soup
  • Potato soup

Delicious springtime soup. You can substitute prawns for the crab, if you'd like.

13 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 75ml half fat soured cream
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • salt and white pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 500g fresh asparagus, trimmed and coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 2 tablespoons plain flour
  • 1.4L chicken stock
  • 2 Maris Piper potatoes, cubed
  • salt and white pepper to taste
  • 125g crab meat

MethodPrep:25min ›Cook:25min ›Ready in:50min

  1. In a small bowl, stir together the soured cream, chives and lemon juice. Season with salt and white pepper. Cover and refrigerate until needed to blend the flavours.
  2. Heat the olive oil and butter in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the asparagus and onion; cook and stir until onion is soft, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and thyme, and cook just until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in the flour until smooth, then gradually whisk in the chicken stock to avoid lumps. Add the potatoes and bring to a simmer. Simmer over medium heat until potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes.
  3. Puree the soup in a food processor or blender, or use an immersion blender in the pot. Return to the pot and bring to a gentle simmer. Season with salt and white pepper.
  4. To serve, ladle soup into warmed bowls and garnish with a dollop of the chive soured cream and a few chunks of crab meat. Garnish with additional chives if you have extra.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(9)

Reviews in English (10)

Used different ingredients.Used Yukon gold potatoes. Also, put the chicken stock in before adding the flour. Our blendeer wasn't big enough for all the soup, so we split it into three sections, then put the blended soup into a different pot.-16 Apr 2010

So delicious. The directions were a little tricky - how do you make the flour smooth before you've added the chicken stock? Should be the other way around. But we figured it out, and it was fantastic. Especially hot with the cold crab and sour cream mix. Almost like the soup I had in a restaurant ten years ago, only that was with lobster (a special occasion). Great for asparagus season!-16 Apr 2010

by EILISH40

As it stands this is quite a tasty recipe but, as one reviewer pointed out, it needed something extra and for us that was curry paste (or powder). Gives it an interesting flavor and goes well with the other ingredients.-24 Jun 2008


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Tips for Sour Cream Dip

The key to this dip is making sure it has time to chill. Trust me, do not skip this step.

This dip will last in the fridge for up to a week in a tightly covered container.

Sour cream shouldn’t be left our for more than 2 hours at room temperature so the same goes for this dip. If you’re serving at a party or potluck where it may sit our longer, you could put the serving bowl on ice to keep cold or use a Dip Chiller . Just remember to replace the ice as it melts.

Dipper ideas:

  • Chips (ruffle potato chips are my favorite)
  • Crackers
  • Veggies such as: broccoli, carrots, peppers, asparagus, celery, cucumbers

Because there is nothing in the sour cream to preserve it, you will want to store it in an airtight container in your fridge. That said, it will last for a good 2 weeks! This rarely lasts that long for me so sometimes I even double down and make a larger batch.

Dairy is a really important ingredient when it comes to baking. It serves many purposes like replacing eggs, making richer cakes, and because it contains acid it tenderizes the gluten so it yields incredibly soft cakes too. This Sour Cream recipe can be used in the place of buttermilk, or even yogurt. One of my favorite ways to use it in my baking is in my Chocolate Bundt Cake. In this case, my sour cream makes all the difference, adding a very distinct richness and moist texture.


Preparation time less than 30 mins Cooking time 10 to 30 mins Serves Serves 4 By Mark Sargeant From The Hairy Bikers' Cook Off Ingredients For the horseradish potatoes 500g/1lb 2oz new potatoes, cooked in &hellip

Preparation time 30 mins to 1 hour Cooking time 10 to 30 mins Serves Serves 4 Hairy Bikers recipes From The Hairy Bikers' Comfort Food Ingredients 8 large mackerel fillets, all bones removed 2 tbsp &hellip


Minnie's Soup Kitchen

Today I made lovage soup, the second recipe by Sophie Grigson in The Soup Book that I have used in the last four days. She introduces the recipe with these remarks: "If you don't grow this old-fashioned herb yourself, ask around among your gardening friends or head down to the nearest garden centre to see if they sell it. " As I mentioned in my last blog entry (18th May), lovage now features among the herbs in my front garden. As the spouse left the camera at home, I took some photographs.

Parsley, sorrel and lovage in Minnie's garden.

Rosemary, parsley and lovage in Minnie's garden.

I had hoped to add chervil to my collection of herbs - there's a recipe for vegetable and chervil soup in The Soup Book - but "Young Stephen" wasn't able to source any for me. At least he tried. Just while I'm mentioning Stephen, I have to reveal that the spouse and the older offspring claim that he has been mentioned in my blog more often than either of them. I'm not going to dignify their complaints by counting the references to any of them.

Back to the lovage soup. The other ingredients include butter, onion, potatoes, carrot, stock (I used vegetable stock prepared by the spouse last night), double cream (I substituted Greek yoghurt) and cayenne pepper. The spouse, the younger offspring and I had the soup for lunch. It was really good: subtly tangy. The younger offspring overdid his sprinkling of cayenne pepper but enjoyed the soup nevertheless.

Yesterday I noticed a lot of bees hovering around the chive flowers in my back garden so I ran out with the camera and tried to take some photographs. Anyone who has tried to take pictures of bees will understand my difficulties. Anyway, here is one of the better shots.

Bee on chive in flower
On my way home from work last Friday (20th May) I heard Philip McCabe on the radio talking about a National Museum of Ireland site at Turlough Park. From the Mayo News website I learned that the festival included a display themed ‘From the Honeybee to the Table’, featuring live bees in observation hives and the making of straw skeps.

During the week I bought a lemon balm plant for the front garden. As I was leafing through a gardening book I read that this plant (Melissa officinalis) is also known as bee balm. However, on trying to verify this, an article on Wikipedia warns against confusing lemon balm with bee balm (Monarda). It does explain that bees are attracted to lemon balm. Here's a link to another article that helps to clarify matters.

Despite my claims about not being an enthusiastic gardener, I was reading Alan Titchmarsh's How to Be a Gardener. Back to Basics to find some tips on choosing flowers. Here's what he wrote about the development of English gardens:

Until a century ago gardens were for producing food . The front garden was where you kept hives of bees for honey that could be used for sweetening. Bee-attracting plants were a must!

Until as recently as the end of the last world war, cottage gardens still enabled their owners to be virtually self-sufficient even today, country gardeners earn pin-money by selling honey, eggs and cut flowers . as they would have done in Victorian and Edwardian times.


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