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Meet Greg Campbell,nuCuisine’s Executive Pastry Chef

Meet Greg Campbell,nuCuisine’s Executive Pastry Chef



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Campbell grew up in Arizona with four siblings. While his brothers and sisters lounged around the pool, he found himself in the kitchen learning to make beef stroganoff and a mean zucchini-banana bread, spending most of his spare time hovering over his oven. “When you bring my family together, everything is about food,” he asserts. Every Sunday, before church, he made coffee cake for his whole family.

In 2012, he finally decided to pursue his culinary passions, moved to Chicago and enrolled at the Cordon Bleu. The school helped him realize his talent for pastries. Towards the end of the one-year program, he applied to Blackbird and got the job.

Located on Randolph Street next to its sister restaurant Avec, Blackbird is one of those restaurants that makes you nervous to touch your food because everything on the plate is so perfectly and strategically placed. There, Campbell worked under Dana Cree, former pastry chef for Noma in Denmark (repeatedly ranked the best restaurant in the world, though it only has two Michelin stars). The two are behind all the one-of-a-kind desserts found at Avec and Blackbird, like the almond amaretto cake and the ricotta-filled crepes. One of the team’s signature creations is the Tangier carrot cake: a blend of cardamom, roasted rhubarb and goat cheese mousse. While studying under Cree, Campbell was offered the opportunity to become the head pastry chef at the Grand Floridian in the Walt Disney Resort and accepted the position. But before leaving, he made one last trip to the Cordon Bleu to thank his teachers and say a final goodbye. Coincidentally, on that same day, the school was hosting a career fair. He was introduced to Erich Geiger and Rick Siwecki, operations manager and head of human resources for nuCuisine, who wanted Campbell to join the team. Despite the fact that he was already committed to Disney, Campbell considered the position. He thought of his daughter, a student at Purdue University, and how he used to cook for her and her friends. “If I’m not going to cook for your university,” he told her, “I’ll do it from my heart [at Northwestern] as if I’m cooking for you.” He cancelled his flight and accepted the position of executive pastry chef for nuCuisine.

Photo by Kirby Barth

The team at nuCuisine is constantly trying to improve their quality, and Campbell’s addition is a step in the right direction. On his end, he’s ready for the challenge and eager to “bring Blackbird into nuCuisine.” With the full support of head chef Chris Studman and chef Joe Birdie, who share his vision to bring fine desserts to Northwestern, Campbell hopes to bring fresh, original recipes into all the dining halls on campus (think comfort foods for desserts). Campbell cooks with the students in mind and often tries to include gluten-free options. “If there’s something that will make you feel better, come to me and I’ll do my best to make that happen,” he urges. Recently, Campbell put on a tasting at Sargent Hall, serving two new recipes (his eggnog flan and a hazelnut cheesecake with chocolate ganache) to over 250 students. They were in awe, asking if it was a one-time-only event. “These kids are foodies,” he jokes, “and they know their food.”

Photo by Kirby Barth

Photo by Kirby Barth

View the original post, Meet Greg Campbell,nuCuisine’s Executive Pastry Chef, on Spoon University.

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11 French Dishes Everyone Should Know How to Cook, According to Chefs

Classic French recipes are among the most comforting, impressive dishes you can add to your repertoire. Whether you&aposre whipping up a perfect rolled omelet for yourself or boeuf bourguignon for company, these French dishes are chef-loved for a reasonand worth mastering.

Cassoulet

"There are a lot of underlying techniques that are needed to complete this recipe, from curing and confiting duck to making a great glaze. Finding balance and using great technique is crucial to making this classic awesome." Colin King, Executive Chef, Maximon

Beef Bourguignon

"I can&apost think of a more perfect dish to make when it&aposs cold out, and a great way to use up old red wine you might have any open. It can be served with potatoes, or any noodles you have on hand." — Gerald Addison, Co-Owner and Co-Executive Chef, Bammy&aposs

"It&aposs is a worldwide-loved classic for a reason. You want to take your time cooking it, at least two hours in the oven at 350ଏ, and don&apost forget to drink a glass of wine or two while making it. This dish tastes better one day after making it, trust me, try it out. Chili will give it a nice kick at the end!" — Edgar Escalante, Executive Chef, Dirty Habit DC

Soufflé

"A French dish that everyone should master is the souffléeither sweet or savory or both. There are many reasons why a soufflé can fail to rise and the texture to be incorrect, so for a chef to eventually fully understand all the reasons why a soufflé can fail would make them a reckoning force in any kitchen. Someone who can turn out perfect soufflé after soufflé should really be able to master anything else in the kitchen." Rob Aikens, Executive Chef, Espita, Las Gemelas, and Ghostburger

Chicken Chasseur

"This is a true French &apospeasant&apos dish that has proven itself time and time again in my home. If you&aposre looking for a hearty one-pot meal that feels like grandma wrapping you up in a blanket, this is it! Pull out your Dutch oven, some French wine, and your best slippers for this one. I always serve my chicken chasseur with rich mashed potatoes and a good crusty loaf of sourdough. I also recommend a good pair of sweatpants." Matthew Kern, Executive Chef, Heirloom Restaurant

Onion Soup

"Nothing seems more French than onion soup. While it&aposs more common in a restaurant setting, every home chef would be well-served by a solid onion soup recipe in their arsenal. Heaps of onions deeply caramelized to the point of almost burning, red wine, rich stock of roasted bones, a float of stale bread supporting a gratinພ of pungent Alpine cheese. The smell alone is capable of waking unknown appetites. Like most wonderful cuisine, it&aposs humble peasant food that transcends when it&aposs made with the care it deserves." Jake Leiber and Aidan O&aposNeal, Chefs, Le਌rocodileਊt the Wythe Hotel

Roast Chicken

"Roast chicken is the perfect classic French dish for any occasion. You can dress it up or dress it down. It can be made for dinner any time of year. The secret to the roast chicken? It starts with a great quality bird." — Julian Marucci, Executive Chef and Partner, Tagliata

"The best way to execute French cooking is to get good and loaded and whack the hell out of a chicken." Julia Child

Omelet

"Eggs are the perfect, and cheapest, way to teach proper technique. There&aposs cracking the eggs correctly, having a place to toss the shells, the best tool used to beat them, the type and quantity of seasoning added before, during, and after cooking, how to heat a pan, when to add the fat, all the visual, aural, aromatic clues of coagulating protein, the essentials of proper presentation, and on and on and on." Mary-Frances Heck, F&W Senior Food Editor

F&W Recipe: French Rolled Omelet

Hollandaise

"This isn&apost a dish per se, but the one sauce I believe every chef needs to know is how to make hollandaise. It is a sauce that works with a lot of dishes, is relatively simple to make (and with only a few ingredients), and it defines the perfection between fattiness, saltiness, and acidity." Roberto Santiba༞z, Chef and Culinary Director, Mi Vida and The Grill by  Knead Hospitality + Design

Tarte Tatin

"Tarte Tatin is a classic, and delicious, French dessert that&aposs not actually that complicated to make. I&aposd argue it&aposs even easier than a double crust pie. Store-bought all-butter puff pastry gets you halfway there, and a simple stovetop caramel sauce paired with in season apples (or pears) make this a rustic dessert worth keeping in your arsenal." Kelsey Youngman, F&W Associate Food Editor

Roast Duck

"I think everyone should master how to cook a duck. Most home cooks are afraid to cook this bird, but I promise is super easy.  If you buy a whole duck, you can easily make two dinners from it. First, you can make roasted duck breast—when cooked properly you will acquire a wonderful golden and crispy skin and juicy rich meat on the inside. It is truly a very flavorful meat. Second, you can make braised legs and thighs, which is a very simple yet luxurious dish. Pair it with some root vegetables and make the perfect weekday dinner." — Ryan Ratino, Executive Chef, Bresca in Washington, D.C.

Steak Frites

"[The frites] are so quick. Seriously, it&aposs going to take you like—I don&apost exaggerate� minutes. That&aposs it." — Ludo Lefebvre


11 French Dishes Everyone Should Know How to Cook, According to Chefs

Classic French recipes are among the most comforting, impressive dishes you can add to your repertoire. Whether you&aposre whipping up a perfect rolled omelet for yourself or boeuf bourguignon for company, these French dishes are chef-loved for a reasonand worth mastering.

Cassoulet

"There are a lot of underlying techniques that are needed to complete this recipe, from curing and confiting duck to making a great glaze. Finding balance and using great technique is crucial to making this classic awesome." Colin King, Executive Chef, Maximon

Beef Bourguignon

"I can&apost think of a more perfect dish to make when it&aposs cold out, and a great way to use up old red wine you might have any open. It can be served with potatoes, or any noodles you have on hand." — Gerald Addison, Co-Owner and Co-Executive Chef, Bammy&aposs

"It&aposs is a worldwide-loved classic for a reason. You want to take your time cooking it, at least two hours in the oven at 350ଏ, and don&apost forget to drink a glass of wine or two while making it. This dish tastes better one day after making it, trust me, try it out. Chili will give it a nice kick at the end!" — Edgar Escalante, Executive Chef, Dirty Habit DC

Soufflé

"A French dish that everyone should master is the souffléeither sweet or savory or both. There are many reasons why a soufflé can fail to rise and the texture to be incorrect, so for a chef to eventually fully understand all the reasons why a soufflé can fail would make them a reckoning force in any kitchen. Someone who can turn out perfect soufflé after soufflé should really be able to master anything else in the kitchen." Rob Aikens, Executive Chef, Espita, Las Gemelas, and Ghostburger

Chicken Chasseur

"This is a true French &apospeasant&apos dish that has proven itself time and time again in my home. If you&aposre looking for a hearty one-pot meal that feels like grandma wrapping you up in a blanket, this is it! Pull out your Dutch oven, some French wine, and your best slippers for this one. I always serve my chicken chasseur with rich mashed potatoes and a good crusty loaf of sourdough. I also recommend a good pair of sweatpants." Matthew Kern, Executive Chef, Heirloom Restaurant

Onion Soup

"Nothing seems more French than onion soup. While it&aposs more common in a restaurant setting, every home chef would be well-served by a solid onion soup recipe in their arsenal. Heaps of onions deeply caramelized to the point of almost burning, red wine, rich stock of roasted bones, a float of stale bread supporting a gratinພ of pungent Alpine cheese. The smell alone is capable of waking unknown appetites. Like most wonderful cuisine, it&aposs humble peasant food that transcends when it&aposs made with the care it deserves." Jake Leiber and Aidan O&aposNeal, Chefs, Le਌rocodileਊt the Wythe Hotel

Roast Chicken

"Roast chicken is the perfect classic French dish for any occasion. You can dress it up or dress it down. It can be made for dinner any time of year. The secret to the roast chicken? It starts with a great quality bird." — Julian Marucci, Executive Chef and Partner, Tagliata

"The best way to execute French cooking is to get good and loaded and whack the hell out of a chicken." Julia Child

Omelet

"Eggs are the perfect, and cheapest, way to teach proper technique. There&aposs cracking the eggs correctly, having a place to toss the shells, the best tool used to beat them, the type and quantity of seasoning added before, during, and after cooking, how to heat a pan, when to add the fat, all the visual, aural, aromatic clues of coagulating protein, the essentials of proper presentation, and on and on and on." Mary-Frances Heck, F&W Senior Food Editor

F&W Recipe: French Rolled Omelet

Hollandaise

"This isn&apost a dish per se, but the one sauce I believe every chef needs to know is how to make hollandaise. It is a sauce that works with a lot of dishes, is relatively simple to make (and with only a few ingredients), and it defines the perfection between fattiness, saltiness, and acidity." Roberto Santiba༞z, Chef and Culinary Director, Mi Vida and The Grill by  Knead Hospitality + Design

Tarte Tatin

"Tarte Tatin is a classic, and delicious, French dessert that&aposs not actually that complicated to make. I&aposd argue it&aposs even easier than a double crust pie. Store-bought all-butter puff pastry gets you halfway there, and a simple stovetop caramel sauce paired with in season apples (or pears) make this a rustic dessert worth keeping in your arsenal." Kelsey Youngman, F&W Associate Food Editor

Roast Duck

"I think everyone should master how to cook a duck. Most home cooks are afraid to cook this bird, but I promise is super easy.  If you buy a whole duck, you can easily make two dinners from it. First, you can make roasted duck breast—when cooked properly you will acquire a wonderful golden and crispy skin and juicy rich meat on the inside. It is truly a very flavorful meat. Second, you can make braised legs and thighs, which is a very simple yet luxurious dish. Pair it with some root vegetables and make the perfect weekday dinner." — Ryan Ratino, Executive Chef, Bresca in Washington, D.C.

Steak Frites

"[The frites] are so quick. Seriously, it&aposs going to take you like—I don&apost exaggerate� minutes. That&aposs it." — Ludo Lefebvre


11 French Dishes Everyone Should Know How to Cook, According to Chefs

Classic French recipes are among the most comforting, impressive dishes you can add to your repertoire. Whether you&aposre whipping up a perfect rolled omelet for yourself or boeuf bourguignon for company, these French dishes are chef-loved for a reasonand worth mastering.

Cassoulet

"There are a lot of underlying techniques that are needed to complete this recipe, from curing and confiting duck to making a great glaze. Finding balance and using great technique is crucial to making this classic awesome." Colin King, Executive Chef, Maximon

Beef Bourguignon

"I can&apost think of a more perfect dish to make when it&aposs cold out, and a great way to use up old red wine you might have any open. It can be served with potatoes, or any noodles you have on hand." — Gerald Addison, Co-Owner and Co-Executive Chef, Bammy&aposs

"It&aposs is a worldwide-loved classic for a reason. You want to take your time cooking it, at least two hours in the oven at 350ଏ, and don&apost forget to drink a glass of wine or two while making it. This dish tastes better one day after making it, trust me, try it out. Chili will give it a nice kick at the end!" — Edgar Escalante, Executive Chef, Dirty Habit DC

Soufflé

"A French dish that everyone should master is the souffléeither sweet or savory or both. There are many reasons why a soufflé can fail to rise and the texture to be incorrect, so for a chef to eventually fully understand all the reasons why a soufflé can fail would make them a reckoning force in any kitchen. Someone who can turn out perfect soufflé after soufflé should really be able to master anything else in the kitchen." Rob Aikens, Executive Chef, Espita, Las Gemelas, and Ghostburger

Chicken Chasseur

"This is a true French &apospeasant&apos dish that has proven itself time and time again in my home. If you&aposre looking for a hearty one-pot meal that feels like grandma wrapping you up in a blanket, this is it! Pull out your Dutch oven, some French wine, and your best slippers for this one. I always serve my chicken chasseur with rich mashed potatoes and a good crusty loaf of sourdough. I also recommend a good pair of sweatpants." Matthew Kern, Executive Chef, Heirloom Restaurant

Onion Soup

"Nothing seems more French than onion soup. While it&aposs more common in a restaurant setting, every home chef would be well-served by a solid onion soup recipe in their arsenal. Heaps of onions deeply caramelized to the point of almost burning, red wine, rich stock of roasted bones, a float of stale bread supporting a gratinພ of pungent Alpine cheese. The smell alone is capable of waking unknown appetites. Like most wonderful cuisine, it&aposs humble peasant food that transcends when it&aposs made with the care it deserves." Jake Leiber and Aidan O&aposNeal, Chefs, Le਌rocodileਊt the Wythe Hotel

Roast Chicken

"Roast chicken is the perfect classic French dish for any occasion. You can dress it up or dress it down. It can be made for dinner any time of year. The secret to the roast chicken? It starts with a great quality bird." — Julian Marucci, Executive Chef and Partner, Tagliata

"The best way to execute French cooking is to get good and loaded and whack the hell out of a chicken." Julia Child

Omelet

"Eggs are the perfect, and cheapest, way to teach proper technique. There&aposs cracking the eggs correctly, having a place to toss the shells, the best tool used to beat them, the type and quantity of seasoning added before, during, and after cooking, how to heat a pan, when to add the fat, all the visual, aural, aromatic clues of coagulating protein, the essentials of proper presentation, and on and on and on." Mary-Frances Heck, F&W Senior Food Editor

F&W Recipe: French Rolled Omelet

Hollandaise

"This isn&apost a dish per se, but the one sauce I believe every chef needs to know is how to make hollandaise. It is a sauce that works with a lot of dishes, is relatively simple to make (and with only a few ingredients), and it defines the perfection between fattiness, saltiness, and acidity." Roberto Santiba༞z, Chef and Culinary Director, Mi Vida and The Grill by  Knead Hospitality + Design

Tarte Tatin

"Tarte Tatin is a classic, and delicious, French dessert that&aposs not actually that complicated to make. I&aposd argue it&aposs even easier than a double crust pie. Store-bought all-butter puff pastry gets you halfway there, and a simple stovetop caramel sauce paired with in season apples (or pears) make this a rustic dessert worth keeping in your arsenal." Kelsey Youngman, F&W Associate Food Editor

Roast Duck

"I think everyone should master how to cook a duck. Most home cooks are afraid to cook this bird, but I promise is super easy.  If you buy a whole duck, you can easily make two dinners from it. First, you can make roasted duck breast—when cooked properly you will acquire a wonderful golden and crispy skin and juicy rich meat on the inside. It is truly a very flavorful meat. Second, you can make braised legs and thighs, which is a very simple yet luxurious dish. Pair it with some root vegetables and make the perfect weekday dinner." — Ryan Ratino, Executive Chef, Bresca in Washington, D.C.

Steak Frites

"[The frites] are so quick. Seriously, it&aposs going to take you like—I don&apost exaggerate� minutes. That&aposs it." — Ludo Lefebvre


11 French Dishes Everyone Should Know How to Cook, According to Chefs

Classic French recipes are among the most comforting, impressive dishes you can add to your repertoire. Whether you&aposre whipping up a perfect rolled omelet for yourself or boeuf bourguignon for company, these French dishes are chef-loved for a reasonand worth mastering.

Cassoulet

"There are a lot of underlying techniques that are needed to complete this recipe, from curing and confiting duck to making a great glaze. Finding balance and using great technique is crucial to making this classic awesome." Colin King, Executive Chef, Maximon

Beef Bourguignon

"I can&apost think of a more perfect dish to make when it&aposs cold out, and a great way to use up old red wine you might have any open. It can be served with potatoes, or any noodles you have on hand." — Gerald Addison, Co-Owner and Co-Executive Chef, Bammy&aposs

"It&aposs is a worldwide-loved classic for a reason. You want to take your time cooking it, at least two hours in the oven at 350ଏ, and don&apost forget to drink a glass of wine or two while making it. This dish tastes better one day after making it, trust me, try it out. Chili will give it a nice kick at the end!" — Edgar Escalante, Executive Chef, Dirty Habit DC

Soufflé

"A French dish that everyone should master is the souffléeither sweet or savory or both. There are many reasons why a soufflé can fail to rise and the texture to be incorrect, so for a chef to eventually fully understand all the reasons why a soufflé can fail would make them a reckoning force in any kitchen. Someone who can turn out perfect soufflé after soufflé should really be able to master anything else in the kitchen." Rob Aikens, Executive Chef, Espita, Las Gemelas, and Ghostburger

Chicken Chasseur

"This is a true French &apospeasant&apos dish that has proven itself time and time again in my home. If you&aposre looking for a hearty one-pot meal that feels like grandma wrapping you up in a blanket, this is it! Pull out your Dutch oven, some French wine, and your best slippers for this one. I always serve my chicken chasseur with rich mashed potatoes and a good crusty loaf of sourdough. I also recommend a good pair of sweatpants." Matthew Kern, Executive Chef, Heirloom Restaurant

Onion Soup

"Nothing seems more French than onion soup. While it&aposs more common in a restaurant setting, every home chef would be well-served by a solid onion soup recipe in their arsenal. Heaps of onions deeply caramelized to the point of almost burning, red wine, rich stock of roasted bones, a float of stale bread supporting a gratinພ of pungent Alpine cheese. The smell alone is capable of waking unknown appetites. Like most wonderful cuisine, it&aposs humble peasant food that transcends when it&aposs made with the care it deserves." Jake Leiber and Aidan O&aposNeal, Chefs, Le਌rocodileਊt the Wythe Hotel

Roast Chicken

"Roast chicken is the perfect classic French dish for any occasion. You can dress it up or dress it down. It can be made for dinner any time of year. The secret to the roast chicken? It starts with a great quality bird." — Julian Marucci, Executive Chef and Partner, Tagliata

"The best way to execute French cooking is to get good and loaded and whack the hell out of a chicken." Julia Child

Omelet

"Eggs are the perfect, and cheapest, way to teach proper technique. There&aposs cracking the eggs correctly, having a place to toss the shells, the best tool used to beat them, the type and quantity of seasoning added before, during, and after cooking, how to heat a pan, when to add the fat, all the visual, aural, aromatic clues of coagulating protein, the essentials of proper presentation, and on and on and on." Mary-Frances Heck, F&W Senior Food Editor

F&W Recipe: French Rolled Omelet

Hollandaise

"This isn&apost a dish per se, but the one sauce I believe every chef needs to know is how to make hollandaise. It is a sauce that works with a lot of dishes, is relatively simple to make (and with only a few ingredients), and it defines the perfection between fattiness, saltiness, and acidity." Roberto Santiba༞z, Chef and Culinary Director, Mi Vida and The Grill by  Knead Hospitality + Design

Tarte Tatin

"Tarte Tatin is a classic, and delicious, French dessert that&aposs not actually that complicated to make. I&aposd argue it&aposs even easier than a double crust pie. Store-bought all-butter puff pastry gets you halfway there, and a simple stovetop caramel sauce paired with in season apples (or pears) make this a rustic dessert worth keeping in your arsenal." Kelsey Youngman, F&W Associate Food Editor

Roast Duck

"I think everyone should master how to cook a duck. Most home cooks are afraid to cook this bird, but I promise is super easy.  If you buy a whole duck, you can easily make two dinners from it. First, you can make roasted duck breast—when cooked properly you will acquire a wonderful golden and crispy skin and juicy rich meat on the inside. It is truly a very flavorful meat. Second, you can make braised legs and thighs, which is a very simple yet luxurious dish. Pair it with some root vegetables and make the perfect weekday dinner." — Ryan Ratino, Executive Chef, Bresca in Washington, D.C.

Steak Frites

"[The frites] are so quick. Seriously, it&aposs going to take you like—I don&apost exaggerate� minutes. That&aposs it." — Ludo Lefebvre


11 French Dishes Everyone Should Know How to Cook, According to Chefs

Classic French recipes are among the most comforting, impressive dishes you can add to your repertoire. Whether you&aposre whipping up a perfect rolled omelet for yourself or boeuf bourguignon for company, these French dishes are chef-loved for a reasonand worth mastering.

Cassoulet

"There are a lot of underlying techniques that are needed to complete this recipe, from curing and confiting duck to making a great glaze. Finding balance and using great technique is crucial to making this classic awesome." Colin King, Executive Chef, Maximon

Beef Bourguignon

"I can&apost think of a more perfect dish to make when it&aposs cold out, and a great way to use up old red wine you might have any open. It can be served with potatoes, or any noodles you have on hand." — Gerald Addison, Co-Owner and Co-Executive Chef, Bammy&aposs

"It&aposs is a worldwide-loved classic for a reason. You want to take your time cooking it, at least two hours in the oven at 350ଏ, and don&apost forget to drink a glass of wine or two while making it. This dish tastes better one day after making it, trust me, try it out. Chili will give it a nice kick at the end!" — Edgar Escalante, Executive Chef, Dirty Habit DC

Soufflé

"A French dish that everyone should master is the souffléeither sweet or savory or both. There are many reasons why a soufflé can fail to rise and the texture to be incorrect, so for a chef to eventually fully understand all the reasons why a soufflé can fail would make them a reckoning force in any kitchen. Someone who can turn out perfect soufflé after soufflé should really be able to master anything else in the kitchen." Rob Aikens, Executive Chef, Espita, Las Gemelas, and Ghostburger

Chicken Chasseur

"This is a true French &apospeasant&apos dish that has proven itself time and time again in my home. If you&aposre looking for a hearty one-pot meal that feels like grandma wrapping you up in a blanket, this is it! Pull out your Dutch oven, some French wine, and your best slippers for this one. I always serve my chicken chasseur with rich mashed potatoes and a good crusty loaf of sourdough. I also recommend a good pair of sweatpants." Matthew Kern, Executive Chef, Heirloom Restaurant

Onion Soup

"Nothing seems more French than onion soup. While it&aposs more common in a restaurant setting, every home chef would be well-served by a solid onion soup recipe in their arsenal. Heaps of onions deeply caramelized to the point of almost burning, red wine, rich stock of roasted bones, a float of stale bread supporting a gratinພ of pungent Alpine cheese. The smell alone is capable of waking unknown appetites. Like most wonderful cuisine, it&aposs humble peasant food that transcends when it&aposs made with the care it deserves." Jake Leiber and Aidan O&aposNeal, Chefs, Le਌rocodileਊt the Wythe Hotel

Roast Chicken

"Roast chicken is the perfect classic French dish for any occasion. You can dress it up or dress it down. It can be made for dinner any time of year. The secret to the roast chicken? It starts with a great quality bird." — Julian Marucci, Executive Chef and Partner, Tagliata

"The best way to execute French cooking is to get good and loaded and whack the hell out of a chicken." Julia Child

Omelet

"Eggs are the perfect, and cheapest, way to teach proper technique. There&aposs cracking the eggs correctly, having a place to toss the shells, the best tool used to beat them, the type and quantity of seasoning added before, during, and after cooking, how to heat a pan, when to add the fat, all the visual, aural, aromatic clues of coagulating protein, the essentials of proper presentation, and on and on and on." Mary-Frances Heck, F&W Senior Food Editor

F&W Recipe: French Rolled Omelet

Hollandaise

"This isn&apost a dish per se, but the one sauce I believe every chef needs to know is how to make hollandaise. It is a sauce that works with a lot of dishes, is relatively simple to make (and with only a few ingredients), and it defines the perfection between fattiness, saltiness, and acidity." Roberto Santiba༞z, Chef and Culinary Director, Mi Vida and The Grill by  Knead Hospitality + Design

Tarte Tatin

"Tarte Tatin is a classic, and delicious, French dessert that&aposs not actually that complicated to make. I&aposd argue it&aposs even easier than a double crust pie. Store-bought all-butter puff pastry gets you halfway there, and a simple stovetop caramel sauce paired with in season apples (or pears) make this a rustic dessert worth keeping in your arsenal." Kelsey Youngman, F&W Associate Food Editor

Roast Duck

"I think everyone should master how to cook a duck. Most home cooks are afraid to cook this bird, but I promise is super easy.  If you buy a whole duck, you can easily make two dinners from it. First, you can make roasted duck breast—when cooked properly you will acquire a wonderful golden and crispy skin and juicy rich meat on the inside. It is truly a very flavorful meat. Second, you can make braised legs and thighs, which is a very simple yet luxurious dish. Pair it with some root vegetables and make the perfect weekday dinner." — Ryan Ratino, Executive Chef, Bresca in Washington, D.C.

Steak Frites

"[The frites] are so quick. Seriously, it&aposs going to take you like—I don&apost exaggerate� minutes. That&aposs it." — Ludo Lefebvre


11 French Dishes Everyone Should Know How to Cook, According to Chefs

Classic French recipes are among the most comforting, impressive dishes you can add to your repertoire. Whether you&aposre whipping up a perfect rolled omelet for yourself or boeuf bourguignon for company, these French dishes are chef-loved for a reasonand worth mastering.

Cassoulet

"There are a lot of underlying techniques that are needed to complete this recipe, from curing and confiting duck to making a great glaze. Finding balance and using great technique is crucial to making this classic awesome." Colin King, Executive Chef, Maximon

Beef Bourguignon

"I can&apost think of a more perfect dish to make when it&aposs cold out, and a great way to use up old red wine you might have any open. It can be served with potatoes, or any noodles you have on hand." — Gerald Addison, Co-Owner and Co-Executive Chef, Bammy&aposs

"It&aposs is a worldwide-loved classic for a reason. You want to take your time cooking it, at least two hours in the oven at 350ଏ, and don&apost forget to drink a glass of wine or two while making it. This dish tastes better one day after making it, trust me, try it out. Chili will give it a nice kick at the end!" — Edgar Escalante, Executive Chef, Dirty Habit DC

Soufflé

"A French dish that everyone should master is the souffléeither sweet or savory or both. There are many reasons why a soufflé can fail to rise and the texture to be incorrect, so for a chef to eventually fully understand all the reasons why a soufflé can fail would make them a reckoning force in any kitchen. Someone who can turn out perfect soufflé after soufflé should really be able to master anything else in the kitchen." Rob Aikens, Executive Chef, Espita, Las Gemelas, and Ghostburger

Chicken Chasseur

"This is a true French &apospeasant&apos dish that has proven itself time and time again in my home. If you&aposre looking for a hearty one-pot meal that feels like grandma wrapping you up in a blanket, this is it! Pull out your Dutch oven, some French wine, and your best slippers for this one. I always serve my chicken chasseur with rich mashed potatoes and a good crusty loaf of sourdough. I also recommend a good pair of sweatpants." Matthew Kern, Executive Chef, Heirloom Restaurant

Onion Soup

"Nothing seems more French than onion soup. While it&aposs more common in a restaurant setting, every home chef would be well-served by a solid onion soup recipe in their arsenal. Heaps of onions deeply caramelized to the point of almost burning, red wine, rich stock of roasted bones, a float of stale bread supporting a gratinພ of pungent Alpine cheese. The smell alone is capable of waking unknown appetites. Like most wonderful cuisine, it&aposs humble peasant food that transcends when it&aposs made with the care it deserves." Jake Leiber and Aidan O&aposNeal, Chefs, Le਌rocodileਊt the Wythe Hotel

Roast Chicken

"Roast chicken is the perfect classic French dish for any occasion. You can dress it up or dress it down. It can be made for dinner any time of year. The secret to the roast chicken? It starts with a great quality bird." — Julian Marucci, Executive Chef and Partner, Tagliata

"The best way to execute French cooking is to get good and loaded and whack the hell out of a chicken." Julia Child

Omelet

"Eggs are the perfect, and cheapest, way to teach proper technique. There&aposs cracking the eggs correctly, having a place to toss the shells, the best tool used to beat them, the type and quantity of seasoning added before, during, and after cooking, how to heat a pan, when to add the fat, all the visual, aural, aromatic clues of coagulating protein, the essentials of proper presentation, and on and on and on." Mary-Frances Heck, F&W Senior Food Editor

F&W Recipe: French Rolled Omelet

Hollandaise

"This isn&apost a dish per se, but the one sauce I believe every chef needs to know is how to make hollandaise. It is a sauce that works with a lot of dishes, is relatively simple to make (and with only a few ingredients), and it defines the perfection between fattiness, saltiness, and acidity." Roberto Santiba༞z, Chef and Culinary Director, Mi Vida and The Grill by  Knead Hospitality + Design

Tarte Tatin

"Tarte Tatin is a classic, and delicious, French dessert that&aposs not actually that complicated to make. I&aposd argue it&aposs even easier than a double crust pie. Store-bought all-butter puff pastry gets you halfway there, and a simple stovetop caramel sauce paired with in season apples (or pears) make this a rustic dessert worth keeping in your arsenal." Kelsey Youngman, F&W Associate Food Editor

Roast Duck

"I think everyone should master how to cook a duck. Most home cooks are afraid to cook this bird, but I promise is super easy.  If you buy a whole duck, you can easily make two dinners from it. First, you can make roasted duck breast—when cooked properly you will acquire a wonderful golden and crispy skin and juicy rich meat on the inside. It is truly a very flavorful meat. Second, you can make braised legs and thighs, which is a very simple yet luxurious dish. Pair it with some root vegetables and make the perfect weekday dinner." — Ryan Ratino, Executive Chef, Bresca in Washington, D.C.

Steak Frites

"[The frites] are so quick. Seriously, it&aposs going to take you like—I don&apost exaggerate� minutes. That&aposs it." — Ludo Lefebvre


11 French Dishes Everyone Should Know How to Cook, According to Chefs

Classic French recipes are among the most comforting, impressive dishes you can add to your repertoire. Whether you&aposre whipping up a perfect rolled omelet for yourself or boeuf bourguignon for company, these French dishes are chef-loved for a reasonand worth mastering.

Cassoulet

"There are a lot of underlying techniques that are needed to complete this recipe, from curing and confiting duck to making a great glaze. Finding balance and using great technique is crucial to making this classic awesome." Colin King, Executive Chef, Maximon

Beef Bourguignon

"I can&apost think of a more perfect dish to make when it&aposs cold out, and a great way to use up old red wine you might have any open. It can be served with potatoes, or any noodles you have on hand." — Gerald Addison, Co-Owner and Co-Executive Chef, Bammy&aposs

"It&aposs is a worldwide-loved classic for a reason. You want to take your time cooking it, at least two hours in the oven at 350ଏ, and don&apost forget to drink a glass of wine or two while making it. This dish tastes better one day after making it, trust me, try it out. Chili will give it a nice kick at the end!" — Edgar Escalante, Executive Chef, Dirty Habit DC

Soufflé

"A French dish that everyone should master is the souffléeither sweet or savory or both. There are many reasons why a soufflé can fail to rise and the texture to be incorrect, so for a chef to eventually fully understand all the reasons why a soufflé can fail would make them a reckoning force in any kitchen. Someone who can turn out perfect soufflé after soufflé should really be able to master anything else in the kitchen." Rob Aikens, Executive Chef, Espita, Las Gemelas, and Ghostburger

Chicken Chasseur

"This is a true French &apospeasant&apos dish that has proven itself time and time again in my home. If you&aposre looking for a hearty one-pot meal that feels like grandma wrapping you up in a blanket, this is it! Pull out your Dutch oven, some French wine, and your best slippers for this one. I always serve my chicken chasseur with rich mashed potatoes and a good crusty loaf of sourdough. I also recommend a good pair of sweatpants." Matthew Kern, Executive Chef, Heirloom Restaurant

Onion Soup

"Nothing seems more French than onion soup. While it&aposs more common in a restaurant setting, every home chef would be well-served by a solid onion soup recipe in their arsenal. Heaps of onions deeply caramelized to the point of almost burning, red wine, rich stock of roasted bones, a float of stale bread supporting a gratinພ of pungent Alpine cheese. The smell alone is capable of waking unknown appetites. Like most wonderful cuisine, it&aposs humble peasant food that transcends when it&aposs made with the care it deserves." Jake Leiber and Aidan O&aposNeal, Chefs, Le਌rocodileਊt the Wythe Hotel

Roast Chicken

"Roast chicken is the perfect classic French dish for any occasion. You can dress it up or dress it down. It can be made for dinner any time of year. The secret to the roast chicken? It starts with a great quality bird." — Julian Marucci, Executive Chef and Partner, Tagliata

"The best way to execute French cooking is to get good and loaded and whack the hell out of a chicken." Julia Child

Omelet

"Eggs are the perfect, and cheapest, way to teach proper technique. There&aposs cracking the eggs correctly, having a place to toss the shells, the best tool used to beat them, the type and quantity of seasoning added before, during, and after cooking, how to heat a pan, when to add the fat, all the visual, aural, aromatic clues of coagulating protein, the essentials of proper presentation, and on and on and on." Mary-Frances Heck, F&W Senior Food Editor

F&W Recipe: French Rolled Omelet

Hollandaise

"This isn&apost a dish per se, but the one sauce I believe every chef needs to know is how to make hollandaise. It is a sauce that works with a lot of dishes, is relatively simple to make (and with only a few ingredients), and it defines the perfection between fattiness, saltiness, and acidity." Roberto Santiba༞z, Chef and Culinary Director, Mi Vida and The Grill by  Knead Hospitality + Design

Tarte Tatin

"Tarte Tatin is a classic, and delicious, French dessert that&aposs not actually that complicated to make. I&aposd argue it&aposs even easier than a double crust pie. Store-bought all-butter puff pastry gets you halfway there, and a simple stovetop caramel sauce paired with in season apples (or pears) make this a rustic dessert worth keeping in your arsenal." Kelsey Youngman, F&W Associate Food Editor

Roast Duck

"I think everyone should master how to cook a duck. Most home cooks are afraid to cook this bird, but I promise is super easy.  If you buy a whole duck, you can easily make two dinners from it. First, you can make roasted duck breast—when cooked properly you will acquire a wonderful golden and crispy skin and juicy rich meat on the inside. It is truly a very flavorful meat. Second, you can make braised legs and thighs, which is a very simple yet luxurious dish. Pair it with some root vegetables and make the perfect weekday dinner." — Ryan Ratino, Executive Chef, Bresca in Washington, D.C.

Steak Frites

"[The frites] are so quick. Seriously, it&aposs going to take you like—I don&apost exaggerate� minutes. That&aposs it." — Ludo Lefebvre


11 French Dishes Everyone Should Know How to Cook, According to Chefs

Classic French recipes are among the most comforting, impressive dishes you can add to your repertoire. Whether you&aposre whipping up a perfect rolled omelet for yourself or boeuf bourguignon for company, these French dishes are chef-loved for a reasonand worth mastering.

Cassoulet

"There are a lot of underlying techniques that are needed to complete this recipe, from curing and confiting duck to making a great glaze. Finding balance and using great technique is crucial to making this classic awesome." Colin King, Executive Chef, Maximon

Beef Bourguignon

"I can&apost think of a more perfect dish to make when it&aposs cold out, and a great way to use up old red wine you might have any open. It can be served with potatoes, or any noodles you have on hand." — Gerald Addison, Co-Owner and Co-Executive Chef, Bammy&aposs

"It&aposs is a worldwide-loved classic for a reason. You want to take your time cooking it, at least two hours in the oven at 350ଏ, and don&apost forget to drink a glass of wine or two while making it. This dish tastes better one day after making it, trust me, try it out. Chili will give it a nice kick at the end!" — Edgar Escalante, Executive Chef, Dirty Habit DC

Soufflé

"A French dish that everyone should master is the souffléeither sweet or savory or both. There are many reasons why a soufflé can fail to rise and the texture to be incorrect, so for a chef to eventually fully understand all the reasons why a soufflé can fail would make them a reckoning force in any kitchen. Someone who can turn out perfect soufflé after soufflé should really be able to master anything else in the kitchen." Rob Aikens, Executive Chef, Espita, Las Gemelas, and Ghostburger

Chicken Chasseur

"This is a true French &apospeasant&apos dish that has proven itself time and time again in my home. If you&aposre looking for a hearty one-pot meal that feels like grandma wrapping you up in a blanket, this is it! Pull out your Dutch oven, some French wine, and your best slippers for this one. I always serve my chicken chasseur with rich mashed potatoes and a good crusty loaf of sourdough. I also recommend a good pair of sweatpants." Matthew Kern, Executive Chef, Heirloom Restaurant

Onion Soup

"Nothing seems more French than onion soup. While it&aposs more common in a restaurant setting, every home chef would be well-served by a solid onion soup recipe in their arsenal. Heaps of onions deeply caramelized to the point of almost burning, red wine, rich stock of roasted bones, a float of stale bread supporting a gratinພ of pungent Alpine cheese. The smell alone is capable of waking unknown appetites. Like most wonderful cuisine, it&aposs humble peasant food that transcends when it&aposs made with the care it deserves." Jake Leiber and Aidan O&aposNeal, Chefs, Le਌rocodileਊt the Wythe Hotel

Roast Chicken

"Roast chicken is the perfect classic French dish for any occasion. You can dress it up or dress it down. It can be made for dinner any time of year. The secret to the roast chicken? It starts with a great quality bird." — Julian Marucci, Executive Chef and Partner, Tagliata

"The best way to execute French cooking is to get good and loaded and whack the hell out of a chicken." Julia Child

Omelet

"Eggs are the perfect, and cheapest, way to teach proper technique. There&aposs cracking the eggs correctly, having a place to toss the shells, the best tool used to beat them, the type and quantity of seasoning added before, during, and after cooking, how to heat a pan, when to add the fat, all the visual, aural, aromatic clues of coagulating protein, the essentials of proper presentation, and on and on and on." Mary-Frances Heck, F&W Senior Food Editor

F&W Recipe: French Rolled Omelet

Hollandaise

"This isn&apost a dish per se, but the one sauce I believe every chef needs to know is how to make hollandaise. It is a sauce that works with a lot of dishes, is relatively simple to make (and with only a few ingredients), and it defines the perfection between fattiness, saltiness, and acidity." Roberto Santiba༞z, Chef and Culinary Director, Mi Vida and The Grill by  Knead Hospitality + Design

Tarte Tatin

"Tarte Tatin is a classic, and delicious, French dessert that&aposs not actually that complicated to make. I&aposd argue it&aposs even easier than a double crust pie. Store-bought all-butter puff pastry gets you halfway there, and a simple stovetop caramel sauce paired with in season apples (or pears) make this a rustic dessert worth keeping in your arsenal." Kelsey Youngman, F&W Associate Food Editor

Roast Duck

"I think everyone should master how to cook a duck. Most home cooks are afraid to cook this bird, but I promise is super easy.  If you buy a whole duck, you can easily make two dinners from it. First, you can make roasted duck breast—when cooked properly you will acquire a wonderful golden and crispy skin and juicy rich meat on the inside. It is truly a very flavorful meat. Second, you can make braised legs and thighs, which is a very simple yet luxurious dish. Pair it with some root vegetables and make the perfect weekday dinner." — Ryan Ratino, Executive Chef, Bresca in Washington, D.C.

Steak Frites

"[The frites] are so quick. Seriously, it&aposs going to take you like—I don&apost exaggerate� minutes. That&aposs it." — Ludo Lefebvre


11 French Dishes Everyone Should Know How to Cook, According to Chefs

Classic French recipes are among the most comforting, impressive dishes you can add to your repertoire. Whether you&aposre whipping up a perfect rolled omelet for yourself or boeuf bourguignon for company, these French dishes are chef-loved for a reasonand worth mastering.

Cassoulet

"There are a lot of underlying techniques that are needed to complete this recipe, from curing and confiting duck to making a great glaze. Finding balance and using great technique is crucial to making this classic awesome." Colin King, Executive Chef, Maximon

Beef Bourguignon

"I can&apost think of a more perfect dish to make when it&aposs cold out, and a great way to use up old red wine you might have any open. It can be served with potatoes, or any noodles you have on hand." — Gerald Addison, Co-Owner and Co-Executive Chef, Bammy&aposs

"It&aposs is a worldwide-loved classic for a reason. You want to take your time cooking it, at least two hours in the oven at 350ଏ, and don&apost forget to drink a glass of wine or two while making it. This dish tastes better one day after making it, trust me, try it out. Chili will give it a nice kick at the end!" — Edgar Escalante, Executive Chef, Dirty Habit DC

Soufflé

"A French dish that everyone should master is the souffléeither sweet or savory or both. There are many reasons why a soufflé can fail to rise and the texture to be incorrect, so for a chef to eventually fully understand all the reasons why a soufflé can fail would make them a reckoning force in any kitchen. Someone who can turn out perfect soufflé after soufflé should really be able to master anything else in the kitchen." Rob Aikens, Executive Chef, Espita, Las Gemelas, and Ghostburger

Chicken Chasseur

"This is a true French &apospeasant&apos dish that has proven itself time and time again in my home. If you&aposre looking for a hearty one-pot meal that feels like grandma wrapping you up in a blanket, this is it! Pull out your Dutch oven, some French wine, and your best slippers for this one. I always serve my chicken chasseur with rich mashed potatoes and a good crusty loaf of sourdough. I also recommend a good pair of sweatpants." Matthew Kern, Executive Chef, Heirloom Restaurant

Onion Soup

"Nothing seems more French than onion soup. While it&aposs more common in a restaurant setting, every home chef would be well-served by a solid onion soup recipe in their arsenal. Heaps of onions deeply caramelized to the point of almost burning, red wine, rich stock of roasted bones, a float of stale bread supporting a gratinພ of pungent Alpine cheese. The smell alone is capable of waking unknown appetites. Like most wonderful cuisine, it&aposs humble peasant food that transcends when it&aposs made with the care it deserves." Jake Leiber and Aidan O&aposNeal, Chefs, Le਌rocodileਊt the Wythe Hotel

Roast Chicken

"Roast chicken is the perfect classic French dish for any occasion. You can dress it up or dress it down. It can be made for dinner any time of year. The secret to the roast chicken? It starts with a great quality bird." — Julian Marucci, Executive Chef and Partner, Tagliata

"The best way to execute French cooking is to get good and loaded and whack the hell out of a chicken." Julia Child

Omelet

"Eggs are the perfect, and cheapest, way to teach proper technique. There&aposs cracking the eggs correctly, having a place to toss the shells, the best tool used to beat them, the type and quantity of seasoning added before, during, and after cooking, how to heat a pan, when to add the fat, all the visual, aural, aromatic clues of coagulating protein, the essentials of proper presentation, and on and on and on." Mary-Frances Heck, F&W Senior Food Editor

F&W Recipe: French Rolled Omelet

Hollandaise

"This isn&apost a dish per se, but the one sauce I believe every chef needs to know is how to make hollandaise. It is a sauce that works with a lot of dishes, is relatively simple to make (and with only a few ingredients), and it defines the perfection between fattiness, saltiness, and acidity." Roberto Santiba༞z, Chef and Culinary Director, Mi Vida and The Grill by  Knead Hospitality + Design

Tarte Tatin

"Tarte Tatin is a classic, and delicious, French dessert that&aposs not actually that complicated to make. I&aposd argue it&aposs even easier than a double crust pie. Store-bought all-butter puff pastry gets you halfway there, and a simple stovetop caramel sauce paired with in season apples (or pears) make this a rustic dessert worth keeping in your arsenal." Kelsey Youngman, F&W Associate Food Editor

Roast Duck

"I think everyone should master how to cook a duck. Most home cooks are afraid to cook this bird, but I promise is super easy.  If you buy a whole duck, you can easily make two dinners from it. First, you can make roasted duck breast—when cooked properly you will acquire a wonderful golden and crispy skin and juicy rich meat on the inside. It is truly a very flavorful meat. Second, you can make braised legs and thighs, which is a very simple yet luxurious dish. Pair it with some root vegetables and make the perfect weekday dinner." — Ryan Ratino, Executive Chef, Bresca in Washington, D.C.

Steak Frites

"[The frites] are so quick. Seriously, it&aposs going to take you like—I don&apost exaggerate� minutes. That&aposs it." — Ludo Lefebvre


11 French Dishes Everyone Should Know How to Cook, According to Chefs

Classic French recipes are among the most comforting, impressive dishes you can add to your repertoire. Whether you&aposre whipping up a perfect rolled omelet for yourself or boeuf bourguignon for company, these French dishes are chef-loved for a reasonand worth mastering.

Cassoulet

"There are a lot of underlying techniques that are needed to complete this recipe, from curing and confiting duck to making a great glaze. Finding balance and using great technique is crucial to making this classic awesome." Colin King, Executive Chef, Maximon

Beef Bourguignon

"I can&apost think of a more perfect dish to make when it&aposs cold out, and a great way to use up old red wine you might have any open. It can be served with potatoes, or any noodles you have on hand." — Gerald Addison, Co-Owner and Co-Executive Chef, Bammy&aposs

"It&aposs is a worldwide-loved classic for a reason. You want to take your time cooking it, at least two hours in the oven at 350ଏ, and don&apost forget to drink a glass of wine or two while making it. This dish tastes better one day after making it, trust me, try it out. Chili will give it a nice kick at the end!" — Edgar Escalante, Executive Chef, Dirty Habit DC

Soufflé

"A French dish that everyone should master is the souffléeither sweet or savory or both. There are many reasons why a soufflé can fail to rise and the texture to be incorrect, so for a chef to eventually fully understand all the reasons why a soufflé can fail would make them a reckoning force in any kitchen. Someone who can turn out perfect soufflé after soufflé should really be able to master anything else in the kitchen." Rob Aikens, Executive Chef, Espita, Las Gemelas, and Ghostburger

Chicken Chasseur

"This is a true French &apospeasant&apos dish that has proven itself time and time again in my home. If you&aposre looking for a hearty one-pot meal that feels like grandma wrapping you up in a blanket, this is it! Pull out your Dutch oven, some French wine, and your best slippers for this one. I always serve my chicken chasseur with rich mashed potatoes and a good crusty loaf of sourdough. I also recommend a good pair of sweatpants." Matthew Kern, Executive Chef, Heirloom Restaurant

Onion Soup

"Nothing seems more French than onion soup. While it&aposs more common in a restaurant setting, every home chef would be well-served by a solid onion soup recipe in their arsenal. Heaps of onions deeply caramelized to the point of almost burning, red wine, rich stock of roasted bones, a float of stale bread supporting a gratinພ of pungent Alpine cheese. The smell alone is capable of waking unknown appetites. Like most wonderful cuisine, it&aposs humble peasant food that transcends when it&aposs made with the care it deserves." Jake Leiber and Aidan O&aposNeal, Chefs, Le਌rocodileਊt the Wythe Hotel

Roast Chicken

"Roast chicken is the perfect classic French dish for any occasion. You can dress it up or dress it down. It can be made for dinner any time of year. The secret to the roast chicken? It starts with a great quality bird." — Julian Marucci, Executive Chef and Partner, Tagliata

"The best way to execute French cooking is to get good and loaded and whack the hell out of a chicken." Julia Child

Omelet

"Eggs are the perfect, and cheapest, way to teach proper technique. There&aposs cracking the eggs correctly, having a place to toss the shells, the best tool used to beat them, the type and quantity of seasoning added before, during, and after cooking, how to heat a pan, when to add the fat, all the visual, aural, aromatic clues of coagulating protein, the essentials of proper presentation, and on and on and on." Mary-Frances Heck, F&W Senior Food Editor

F&W Recipe: French Rolled Omelet

Hollandaise

"This isn&apost a dish per se, but the one sauce I believe every chef needs to know is how to make hollandaise. It is a sauce that works with a lot of dishes, is relatively simple to make (and with only a few ingredients), and it defines the perfection between fattiness, saltiness, and acidity." Roberto Santiba༞z, Chef and Culinary Director, Mi Vida and The Grill by  Knead Hospitality + Design

Tarte Tatin

"Tarte Tatin is a classic, and delicious, French dessert that&aposs not actually that complicated to make. I&aposd argue it&aposs even easier than a double crust pie. Store-bought all-butter puff pastry gets you halfway there, and a simple stovetop caramel sauce paired with in season apples (or pears) make this a rustic dessert worth keeping in your arsenal." Kelsey Youngman, F&W Associate Food Editor

Roast Duck

"I think everyone should master how to cook a duck. Most home cooks are afraid to cook this bird, but I promise is super easy.  If you buy a whole duck, you can easily make two dinners from it. First, you can make roasted duck breast—when cooked properly you will acquire a wonderful golden and crispy skin and juicy rich meat on the inside. It is truly a very flavorful meat. Second, you can make braised legs and thighs, which is a very simple yet luxurious dish. Pair it with some root vegetables and make the perfect weekday dinner." — Ryan Ratino, Executive Chef, Bresca in Washington, D.C.

Steak Frites

"[The frites] are so quick. Seriously, it&aposs going to take you like—I don&apost exaggerate� minutes. That&aposs it." — Ludo Lefebvre


Watch the video: Ο Χρήστος Χατζηιωάννου σε ρόλο ζαχαροπλάστη (August 2022).